Natural Solutions for Acid Reflux



Have Heartburn? Get Help

Wisconsin woman urges other sufferers to not wait as long as she did.

By Dennis Thompson Jr., HealthDay News

Don't Miss This

Sign Up for OurDigestive HealthNewsletter

Thanks for signing up!You might also like these other newsletters:

THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2012 (HealthDay News) —Susan Schneck began suffering from frequent, painful heartburn in 1998.

"In the evening and especially after lying down to go to sleep, I would invariably experience heartburn," Schneck said. "It was a burning. Not exactly nausea, but that same type of upward sensation, only with that burning. Like you'd had a hot drink or really, really spicy food. And once it started, it wouldn't go away."

It never occurred to Schneck, now 37 and living in Madison, Wis., to go to a doctor for treatment. "I kind of knew, 'Oh, it's heartburn.' It never occurred to me it could be something worse," she said. "It also never occurred to me it could be something I could fix."

Instead, she dealt with the problem by chewing antacid tablets. "I'd never done anything but take Tums," she said. "I took two Tums a day, at least. Pretty much every day I experienced symptoms, and every day I had to take Tums for them."

This went on until 2004, when she was working at a hospital in North Carolina and saw that a clinical trial was being offered that involved an endoscopic evaluation. The trial was looking for people with chronic heartburn to test them for Barrett's esophagus, a potential side effect of gastroesophageal reflux disease that can lead to cancer.

"I realized, 'Geez, I shouldn't have let this go untreated for so long,'" Schneck recalled.

Schneck had the endoscopy, and the researchers found no severe damage. However, they told her that if she was experiencing heartburn as often as she reported, she needed medical treatment.

"I just went to my primary care doctor and told her what I'd been told," Schneck said. "She put me on a two-week trial of Nexium (a proton pump inhibitor), and it was amazing. I had relief from the first pill on. I didn't have heartburn that afternoon, for the first time in I don't know how long."

Schneck also started working on her weight. She weighed more than 260 pounds when she began experiencing symptoms, and by 2008 she was up to 280 pounds. After her mother and sister were diagnosed with diabetes, she decided to try to drop some pounds to decrease her risk for the disease.

Weight loss, she discovered, had the added benefit of relieving her acid reflux, too. "As soon as I lost the first 50 pounds, my symptoms really started going down," Schneck said. By 2009, she was able to stop taking medication.

"I would say I'm symptom-free now, all but maybe one day a month," she said.






Video: Heartburn During Pregnancy: What to Do

Have Heartburn Get Help
Have Heartburn Get Help images

2019 year
2019 year - Have Heartburn Get Help pictures

Have Heartburn Get Help forecasting
Have Heartburn Get Help recommendations photo

Have Heartburn Get Help photo
Have Heartburn Get Help photo

Have Heartburn Get Help Have Heartburn Get Help new pictures
Have Heartburn Get Help new foto

pictures Have Heartburn Get Help
photo Have Heartburn Get Help

Watch Have Heartburn Get Help video
Watch Have Heartburn Get Help video

Discussion on this topic: Have Heartburn Get Help, have-heartburn-get-help/
Communication on this topic: Have Heartburn Get Help, have-heartburn-get-help/ , have-heartburn-get-help/

Related News


Everything You Could Possibly Want to Know About the Spice Girls Upcoming Tour
How to Build a Concrete Sidewalk
Don’t let these foods sabotage your stamina
Sulfacetamide Sodium-Urea Topical
How to Find Out Who Is Sending You Valentines Cards
These Are The 6 Best Remedies For Gas And Bloating
16 Best Kept Japanese Beauty Secrets You Should Be Aware Of
5 Running Myths You Should Stop Believing Now
Le Bristol
Thousand Oaks college bar mass shooting: 13 dead, including gunman



Date: 06.12.2018, 16:34 / Views: 74273